LinkedIn Makes Us Very Lazy!

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LinkedIn is an incredible platform for connecting with prospects, current customer and old colleagues and friends. I’ve really enjoyed my time on LinkedIn for the past several years. The reality is, social platforms change over time, and the one big thing that I have noticed about LinkedIn over the past year, is they are cultivating an online culture of laziness. Yes laziness!

What do I mean by that.

Five things stand out for me that promote lazy networking/corresponding on LinkedIn:

 

  1. Congratulations on the new job emails – “Congrats on new role. Hope you’re doing well.” Received close to 100 of these when I changed jobs 2 years ago. 90+ of the emails I received were this generic note.
  2. Congratulations on the work anniversary emails – “Congrats on the anniversary! Hope you’re doing well!” This is the generic email that is sent if you acknowledge a connection’s anniversary. I was very grateful for all of the well wishes that I received on a recent work anniversary, but 95% of the people just hit the button that generated the autoreply.
  3. Happy Birthday emails – “Happy Birthday!” Yeah standard stuff right? Same thing. I high percentage of people just hit that button to send the generic note.
  4. Thank you for the endorsement emails – “Thank you for the recent endorsement“. Or something similar to that. This time, I was about to send the thank you to a connection this weekend, then said “ugggh” as the generic reply came up. I personalized it, then sent it off.
  5. Invitation to connect on LinkedIn – You know the one! If you’ve followed me for a while, you know how I feel about this.

I’m a huge advocate of the personalization of correspondence online, and LinkedIn is fostering the exact opposite behaviours with the four examples above. I’m sure there are other ways that laziness occurs with them, but I have not come across those yet.

I think they mean well, and are trying to save us time with these crazy busy lives that we live. But I don’t think they are doing us any favours.

I will elaborate on two of the examples above:

  • I would have felt much better receiving 7 birthday greetings that people took the time to personalize, then 50 generic ones.
  • I will always accept an invitation request faster if the potential connection has taken 30 seconds to personalize the invite, rather than just hit “connect“.

My opinion will never change. Personalization is the way to go when you are social networking. It’s not always possible to do, but I would shoot for as often as you can.

When we are living in a world that promotes high-paced up to the minute interactions, wouldn’t it be nice to remember that everyone is unique, and deserves that personal touch?

 

I would love to hear what you think about my four points above, or anything else that might be bothering you about LinkedIn right now!

Have a great week!

 

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